Thursday, August 3, 2017

Garden Mysteries and Little Wonderous Things

 
"My idea of gardening is to discover something wild in my wood and weed around it with the utmost care until it has a chance to grow and spread."
-- Margaret Bourke-White, American photographer

In early May, I planted annuals in beds and pots, and some of them are lush, spilling to the ground. Others are struggling in the heat. To my surprise, last year's annuals have reseeded here and there--and in unusual places.
For a while now, I've been watching a mysterious volunteer flourish in a neglected patio bed. I have no idea what it is--perhaps a coneflower. My husband tried to yank it up, but I convinced him to let it stay a while longer. This appealed to his scientific side, and just in time. Today, I noticed a tight, little bud.

Our lives were hectic in June, but I found a moment to buy petunias for the large saucer urns that came with the house. The previous owner had preferred petunias, and I see why: the urns receive just the right amount of sun.

This year, the potted ferns have gone wild, and I've only fed them once.

The most surprising garden mystery is unfolding in the pool area.
Last fall, I decorated the covered porch with heirloom pumpkins. On a chilly day in November, I piled the withered things into a wheelbarrow and pushed them to the edge of the property, hoping that a few seeds would take root in the pasture. I had visions of a trailing pumpkin patch and me loading them into the wheelbarrow--I loved the idea of homegrown Halloween pumpkins. So far, I haven't seen a thing in the pasture, but oddly enough, a vine started to grow in a tiny patio bed. The leaves are gigantic.

The vines are vigorous climbers, twisting up the brick pillars--up, up, up to the second-story trellis.

Every morning, the blossoms are full and vibrant, but by mid-day, they wilt.

I've got my fingers crossed for volunteer pumpkins.

"Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them."
-- A. A. Milne

In another patio bed, a tall, lovely yellow flower appeared one day. Last year, in this same bed,
I'd planted angelonia, coneflowers, and zinnias. This spot is a tough place for any flower, because the soil barely covers the cement. But a volunteer defied the odds. And the odd, wonderous thing is...I hadn't planted anything that resembles this flower.

Of course, we have garden variety weeds, too. The Virginia creeper has gone wild, leaping onto pillars and shingles, as if it has strayed from a fairy tale.

This afternoon, as I leaned into the wildness to cut hydrangeas, I almost stepped into a spider web. I hurried inside for my camera, and I was so mesmerized by the intricate design, I forgot to cut flowers. But this was magic.

"Wisdom is oftentime nearer when we stoop than when we soar."
-- William Wordsworth

Shared at Garden's Galore

21 comments:

  1. Your garden is really coming along. I have always felt that if you love flowers, they will love you back with beautiful blooms. Great photos.

    Mary

    ReplyDelete
  2. We have had volunteer pumpkin vines for several years. The heat usually gets them, but one year we had a little crop of ornamental ones. I want to invite you to link this post on Gardens Galore on Monday, August 7 at 8am central! Have a wonderful Thursday, Michael Lee!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the invitation, Pam. See you on Monday!

      Delete
  3. Hi Michael Lee, I think your mystery plant with the bud might be a zinnia. I enjoyed your garden tour today! Hope you are well.
    Blessings, Beth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right, Beth! I am looking forward to seeing the color. Fun!

      Delete
  4. My garden mystery this year turned out to be American basket flower. I am in love! I totally forgot planting seeds last year so I'm glad I didn't pull them as weeds. Right now they are covered with huge 5 inch punk/blue/lavender blooms that draw the hummingbirds & butterflies. Along with the zinnias & coneflowers drawing the yellow finches & sparrows my garden is a happy busy place most days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not familiar with American basket flower...going to look it up!

      Delete
  5. More in the garden grows than what the gardener sows and August is a month for wild vines and volunteers! I've been watching plants sprout up for a month now that I didn't plant and finally identified them as milkweed! The Gulf fritillary have already found it and I'm keeping my fingers crossed the Monarchs do too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true, Mary. I am going to hunt for milkweed in the yard!

      Delete
  6. Here's hoping you get pumpkins! That would be exciting!

    ReplyDelete
  7. One year I had a glorious tunnel of baby pumpkins, they refused to ever grow there again... no garden at the beach, living in the jet stream has shown me the error of my ways, it's fun to see your greenery!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had volunteers at the old house, and they took over the yard and driveway. I even had a few pumpkins.

      Delete
  8. I had a volunteer pumpkin plant appear in my garden a couple of years ago. It flowered so I decided to let the vine continue to grow but I didn't get any pumpkins. We all decided that a bird had dropped seeds there from the pumpkins of the previous year. It's still fun to see it grow. That yellow flower made me think of a double yellow sunflower I saw recently. Have a wonderful weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A bird! I think that must have happened with my volunteer marigolds. A huge clump grew up in an odd place.

      Delete
  9. I love gardens' little surprises. I have some flowers growing from reseed from 3 years ago!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Sure hope you do get some pumpkins. That would be exciting.
    Love your spider web picture.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Michael Lee, I am stopping back by to thank you for sharing at Gardens Galore! We have little pumpkins as of the last couple of days on a volunteer vine!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Good morning, I am featuring your post today on Gardens Galore! Happy Labor Day!

    ReplyDelete